Letters to the Editor: 10/28

Dear Editor,

There once was a joke I heard, and it went something like this, “I’m tired of all this nonsense about beauty being only skin-deep. That’s deep enough. What do you want—an adorable pancreas?” This made me chuckle, but [it] also made me realize how shallow we all are as Americans. In the last Chronicle, “Beauty in The Eyes Employer” really stuck out to me because there is no doubt that the article is absolutely correct. It’s sad in my op inion because the article shows how shallow the business world really is. In the business world, they would much rather hire a beautiful woman that has about half as much knowledge as a woman less attractive who is brilliant. You see beautiful models with perfect skin and perfect hair on TV commercials and shows, [who] are probably dumber than a box of rocks. Then you have the smarter less attractive people who wear an average American pant size of 14 sitting at home wishing they could have that job. The fact of the matter is that it’s simple, in the business world, if the company thinks they will attract more customers by having more attractive employees, right or wrong, they will do just that to make their business thrive. No matter who you are, life is unfair at some point, and you have to get used to it. This is just one prime example that life is unfair, and it’s always going to be unfair.

Meghan Grable, freshman

Dear Editor,

The budget cuts are not very intelligent when there are local grants being given to classes. It doesn’t make any sense that Mason is cutting bussing and other important functions that students and groups need. Thanks to the new Senate Bill 210, clubs and sports teams to not be able to sell food for the health of students. This is going to drastically affect how things are done. It doesn’t make sense that only 130 students will utilize the $5,718 that has been given to the Environmental Science classes in the third trimester. With all of the budget cuts, the money should be used to clubs and other groups within the district that will affect most of the students. STUGO could use the money to replace the Seroogy Bar sales. This would help STUGO to continue what they do to help the community. STUGO could use the $5,718 and another $450 that went to a support education class to help the community. That would total to $6,168 that Mason could use to help STUGO keep going. This could take out some of the deficit left by the Senate Bill 210 and help to keep activities and clubs going in the future.

Cameron Forsythe, freshman


Dear Editor,

No more bake sales? I think this is taking a good idea too far. Senate Bill 210 says that you can’t sell unhealthy food during school, meaning no more bake sales or hot dogs at Mason High School. I think the schools should be teaching students more about making healthy choices, not just eliminating all unhealthy food during school They should be teaching that you should only eat sweets in moderation. Even if students can’t get sweets at school, they will just go home and eat whatever they want. They should be focusing on exercise too, not just getting rid of unhealthy food.
Without having bake sales or Seroogy bars to sell, I think it will make it a lot harder to do fundraising for the school, because I don’t think as many people will buy fruits and vegetables at school. It will affect other causes too, because you might not raise as much money for the causes you are trying to help, like Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. You could get creative with what to sell, but it might not sell as well as a bake sale or hot dogs might.

Taylor Wood, freshman

Dear Editor, 

It’s cold. And the bus stop still is a long way away. It seems even longer with the budget cuts that have started this year, and we students have noticed. But I believe the deduction of bus stops per neighborhood is one of the major impacts to those of us who don’t drive yet, …Sure, this deduction probably only impacts freshman and sophomores here at the high school but then, it also impacts MMS and MI students as well. Yes, the budgets have been cut, but there are other things they could fix other than dedicuting the number of bus stops. I’m sure that no one is very fond or happy with getting up even earlier than they have been. Winter seems to last forever, and having to walk ten minutes to the nearest bus stop will be irritable, so I don’t think that of the things they cut or deduct, they should deduct bus stops.

 

 

Avery Heffron, freshman