Opinion: Try to enjoy yourself more

Andrea Hefferan | Managing Editor

“Seniors, give us your loudest cheer!”

Instead of hearing a roar coming from the stands, at this pep rally, I only hear a half-hearted hurrah. The benches surrounding me are empty.

This year, those without a seventh bell were allowed to choose whether or not to come to the pep rally. And many seniors chose to head home, even ones with a seventh bell.

It was the last pep rally of our high school lives. It could’ve been the best one, too–we’re the seniors. The most experienced, the loudest, the ones with the most school spirit. But instead, so many people decided to skip out, saying there was no point in going. 

But is there anything else people could have been doing that unites the entire school as the pep rally does? Student Government put countless hours into making sure the rally went perfectly, and instead of supporting and appreciating their effort, their peers decided it wasn’t worth their time.

A lot of people didn’t go because they “don’t have fun” at pep rallies. But the thing is, they’re the ones ridiculing every performance. The ones on Snapchat instead of cheering with their classmates. The only reason they’re not having fun is because of themselves. 

MHS seniors aren’t the only ones with this mentality, though. It’s so hard nowadays to simply enjoy something. We can’t just watch a movie anymore; we have to write a scathing review criticizing minor details. We can’t just read a book anymore; we have to annotate it and figure out what the author meant by making the curtains blue. We can’t just go to a concert anymore; we have to record every second to post it online so our followers can see it. For a lot of people, enjoying the moment is their last priority.

And those who do enjoy things are ridiculed for it. Some things are “universally hated,” and if a person likes them, people think there’s something wrong with them. But what does it matter if someone’s favorite movie is rated 10% on Rotten Tomatoes? It accomplishes nothing to make fun of a person for liking something most don’t. All it does is take away the person’s joy for something they’re passionate about. And honestly, it doesn’t feel good to be around someone who never has anything positive to say.

It seemed so much easier to be happy during the “good old days” of our childhoods, where everything seemed exciting and new. But while we can’t change the past, we can still maintain that same enthusiasm today. There is no law stating that once you grow up, you have to stop caring about things. We are the ones who get to decide how we approach life–and technically, most of us are still in our childhoods.

We need to stop finding the negatives in everything we come into contact with. I’m sure you’re formulating arguments against this column right now. But whether it’s this column, a book, movie, concert, or pep rally, you can probably find at least one aspect you appreciate. And it’s about time we focus on those instead.

Instead of hearing a roar coming from the stands, at this pep rally, I only hear a half-hearted hurrah. The benches surrounding me are empty.

This year, those without a seventh bell were allowed to choose whether or not to come to the pep rally. And many seniors chose to head home.

It was the last pep rally of our high school lives. It could’ve been the best one, too–we’re the seniors. The most experienced, the loudest, the ones with the most school spirit. But instead, so many people decided to skip out, saying there was no point in going. 

But is there anything else people could have been doing that unites the entire school as the pep rally does? Student Government put countless hours into making sure the rally went perfectly, and instead of supporting and appreciating their effort, their peers decided it wasn’t worth their time.

A lot of people didn’t go because they “don’t have fun” at pep rallies. But the thing is, they’re the ones ridiculing every performance. The ones on Snapchat instead of cheering with their classmates. The only reason they’re not having fun is because of themselves. 

Mason seniors aren’t the only ones with this mentality, though. It’s so hard nowadays to simply enjoy something. We can’t just watch a movie anymore; we have to write a scathing review criticizing minor details. We can’t just read a book anymore; we have to annotate it and figure out what the author meant by making the curtains blue. We can’t just go to a concert anymore; we have to record every second to post it online so our followers can see it. For a lot of people, enjoying the moment is their last priority.

And those who do enjoy things are ridiculed for it. Some things are “universally hated,” and if a person likes them, people think there’s something wrong with them. But what does it matter if someone’s favorite movie is rated 10% on Rotten Tomatoes? It accomplishes nothing to make fun of a person for liking something most don’t. All it does is take away the person’s joy for something they’re passionate about. And honestly, it doesn’t feel good to be around someone who never has anything positive to say.

We need to stop finding the negatives in everything we come into contact with. I’m sure you’re formulating arguments against this column right now. But whether it’s this column, a book, movie, concert, or pep rally, you can probably find at least one aspect you appreciate. And it’s about time we focus on those instead.

ahefferan.chronicle@gmail.com